Dawn Moore

Dawn Enoch Moore has been a leader in Dallas’ legal and business community for over 35 years. Moore is founder and Chief Executive Officer of Allegiance Title Company, one of the largest and fastest growing independent real estate title agencies in Texas, with 22 offices and over 100 employees in North Texas and Houston.

Most recently, she co-founded Allegiance National Settlement Services LLC, a national title insurance agency, which will be licensed in over 35 states and have the ability to handle settlement services for regional and national clients throughout the United States.

Moore has served the real estate and title industry in a variety of capacities. She was one of six lawyers appointed by the State Bar of Texas to the Texas Real Estate Commissions’ Broker/Lawyer Committee, which is responsible for writing the residential purchase/sale contracts used by real estate licensed holders statewide. She served in this position for twelve years. She also served as President for the Texas Land Title Association for 2014-­‐2015.

Moore had the distinct honor in 1998 of being appointed by then Governor of Texas, George W. Bush to Chair of the Texas State Affordable Housing Corporation, which financed thousands of units of affordable housing. Working on behalf of the homeless, Moore has also served as Chair of the Board of Interfaith Housing Coalition and member of the Board of Dallas Habitat for Humanity. In 2014, Moore received the Dallas Business Journal Women in Business Award for her impact in the North Texas business community.

Moore is active in her community serving as Mayor ProTem of the City of University Park. Prior to her election to City Council, she served on the Planning and Zoning Commission and as Chair of the Legislative Committee of the City. Moore is a member of the Board of the Dallas Zoological Society and serves as Chair of the Long Range Planning Committee for the Dallas Zoo. She is a member of the Alumni Board of Trustees for Southern Methodist University, a member of the SMU Planned Giving Council, and a former member of the Methodist Health Systems Capital Campaign Committee. She has served in various leadership roles including Chapter Chair for the Dallas Chapter of World Presidents’ Organization. A longtime member of University Park United Methodist Church, she has served on the Foundation Board, and taught Sunday School.

Moore holds a B.S. degree in Economics, graduating Magna Cum Laude and a J.D. degree from Southern Methodist University, receiving the award for the highest grade in Real Estate Transactions. In 2005, she was awarded the Distinguished Alumni Award for Corporate Service from the SMU Dedman School of Law. She is married and has three grown children and one daughter‐in‐law.

Martha Reed

Martha Reed’s career has over 40 years in banking, mortgage and title industry experience. Every step of her career has prepared her for the role of Chief Operating Officer of Allegiance Title Company.

Her banking career included serving multiple banks as their Operations Officer where she also managed the lending and investment departments. A background in real estate lending allowed her to utilize her skills in the mortgage industry where she served as Closing Department Manager for seven years. In 1989, she used her financial expertise to secure a position with a new title company venture and served as their Accounting Manager/Escrow Officer. Martha joined Allegiance Title Company in 1997 and was named Executive Vice President in 2003. In her current role, Martha is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the company. Her expertise in operational workflow and escrow lend the perfect support to the branch offices of the company. Her unbridled enthusiasm for the challenges of the title business serves as an inspiration and example of doing things the right way with a great attitude. Her focus is on serving both the customers and the employees while representing the guiding principles of Allegiance Title Company. Martha has always had a commitment to serve in the community where she lives. Over the years, her roles have included President of the Chamber of Commerce, President of the local chapter of the National Association of Bank Women, and member of the Mayor’s Commission. She has served on boards for the March of Dimes, Salvation Army, United Way and Keep Lewisville Beautiful. She is active in in her church, First Baptist Church of Lewisville as a member of the Sanctuary Choir and Director of 5th Grade Children’s Sunday school. She is also a TLTA member.

Graham Hanks

Graham Hanks is Executive Vice President of Allegiance Title Company. In this role, Hanks is responsible for recruitment and growing the Allegiance Title footprint in North Texas and Houston.

Hanks brings 13 years of real estate and title experience to Allegiance Title Company with a focus on recruitment, training, talent acquisition and developing customer-centric programs. Hanks takes a creative and collaborative approach to team building and has implemented proven models for market growth.

Hanks has served in various leadership roles for real estate companies and title insurance companies in Texas. He has been a member of the Collin County Association of Realtors since 2005. Hanks is married to his high school sweetheart and resides in Prosper with their two daughters and son. They are members of Preston Trail Church in Frisco. Much of their spare time is spent at sporting activities or traveling.

Mission statement

At Allegiance Title Company, we strive to deliver the highest standards in title closing transactions. Our success is dependent on the pledge we make our customers to always deliver the residential, commercial and lender title services they deserve.



We rely on three core values to guide everything we do as a company:

Service Excellence

Because title insurance rates are established by the Texas Department of Insurance, we know that being the best title insurance company in Texas requires delivering the best service to our customers. That's why personal service is our highest priority. Allegiance Title has built a foundation of success on being the most knowledgeable in the business and  responsive to our customers, proactively addressing any challenges that would prevent a closing from occurring as scheduled. We pledge to serve you in any way possible and are constantly seeking to improve the quality and variety of resources we provide our customers.

Ethics and Integrity

Our integrity defines who we are as a company and it's the reason why we're able to represent the best underwriters in industry. They know we don't compromise on our fiduciary responsibilities as an independent agency and are committed to closing transactions the right way, so you can trust in us to meet any and all legal obligations. We work hard to ensure that the proposed insured is always protected, and that both parties accomplish their goals.

Dedication

We believe that employees who are dedicated to their jobs deliver the best customer service. Our management team works to promote this belief by seeking out individuals who are passionate about their work and providing them with the resources and support for them to succeed. Allegiance Title employees are treated like they're family and are assured that their performance is backed by a company that is as dedicated to them as they are to their customers.

Allegiance Title Company ("Allegiance") is committed to operating in full compliance with all applicable state and federal laws. We have adopted and implemented policies and procedures as the minimum standards for the operation of our business and for employee education in order to: (a) conform to federal and state consumer protection laws, and (b) to ensure protection of consumer funds, as well as consumer and/or client non-public personal information. Additionally, it is the intent of Allegiance to follow the Title Insurance and Settlement Company Best Practices ("Best Practices") that were issued by the American Land Title Association ("ALTA") in July 2013, as such may be amended.

The content of ALTA's Best Practices is reprinted below.  There are seven "pillars" of Best Practices, and below the description of each pillar is a brief overview of Allegiance's compliance with that specific pillar.

Title Insurance and Settlement Company Best Practices


Mission Statement

  • ALTA seeks to guide its membership on best practices to protect consumers, promote quality service, provide for ongoing employee training, and meet legal and market requirements. These practices are voluntary and designed to help members illustrate to consumers and clients the industry's professionalism and best practices to help ensure a positive and compliant real estate settlement experience. These best practices are not intended to encompass all aspects of title or settlement company activity.
  • ALTA is publishing these best practices for the mortgage lending and real estate settlement industry. ALTA accepts comments from stakeholders as the Association seeks to continually improve these best practices. A formal committee of ALTA members regularly reviews and makes improvements to these best practices, seeking comment on each revision.

 

Definitions

Background Check:  A background check is the process of compiling and reviewing both confidential and public employment, address, and criminal records of an individual or an organization. Background checks may be limited in geographic scope. This provision and use of these reports are subject to the limitations of federal and state law.

Company:  The entity implementing these best practices.

Escrow:  A transaction in which an impartial third party acts in a fiduciary capacity for the seller, buyer, borrower, or lender in performing the closing for a real estate transaction according to local practice and custom. The escrow holders have fiduciary responsibility for prudent processing, safeguarding and accounting for funds and documents entrusted to them.

Escrow Trust Account: An account to hold funds in trust for third parties, including parties to a real estate transaction. These funds are held subject to a fiduciary capacity as established by written instructions.

Federally Insured Financial Institutions: A financial institution that has its deposits insured by an instrumentality of the federal government, including the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and National Credit Union Administration (NCUA).

Licenses:  Title Agent or Producer License or registration, or any other business licensing requirement as required by state law, or a license to practice law, where applicable.

Non-public Personal Information: Personally identifiable data such as information provided by a customer on a form or application, information about a customer's transactions, or any other information about a customer which is otherwise unavailable to the general public. NPI includes first name or first initial and last name coupled with any of the following: Social Security Number, driver's license number, state-issued ID number, credit card number, debit card number, or other financial account numbers.

Positive Pay or Reverse Positive Pay: Any system by which the authenticity of a check is determined before payment is made by the financial institution against which the check is written.

Settlement:  In some areas called a "closing." The process of completing a real estate transaction in accordance with written instructions during which deeds, mortgages, leases and other required instruments are executed and/or delivered, an accounting between the parties is made, the funds are disbursed and the appropriate documents are recorded.

Trial Balance: A list of all open individual escrow ledger record balances at the end of the reconciliation period.

Three-Way Reconciliation: A three-way reconciliation is a method for discovering shortages (intentional or otherwise), charges that must be reimbursed or any type of errors or omissions that must be corrected in relation to an Escrow Trust Account. This requires the escrow trial balance, the book balance and the reconciled bank balance to be compared. If all three parts do not agree, the difference shall be investigated and corrected.

 

Best Practices

1.     Best Practice:  Establish and maintain current License(s) as required to conduct the business of title insurance and settlement services.

Purpose:  Maintaining state mandated insurance licenses and corporate registrations (as applicable) helps ensure the Company remains in good standing with the state.

Procedures to meet this best practice:

  • Establish and maintain applicable business License(s).
  • Establish and maintain compliance with Licensing, registration, or similar requirements with the applicable state regulatory department or agency.
  • Establish and maintain appropriate compliance with ALTA's Policy Forms Licensing requirement.

 

Allegiance complies with Best Practice #1.

Allegiance's state-mandated insurance licenses or registrations, corporate registrations or other business licensing requirements, title agent or producer licenses or registrations, and licenses to practice law, where applicable ("Licenses") are kept effective and current. 

Our Compliance Officer maintains a chart of company and employee Licenses to ensure Licenses are in good standing and timely renewed with the appropriate regulatory department or agency, as applicable. The Texas Department of Insurance ("TDI") regulates title insurance in Texas, and TDI audits Allegiance every two years for compliance with its regulatory rules.

Under Texas law, pursuant to Procedural Rule P-35 (Rates and Forms for the Writing of Title Insurance in the State of Texas) of the Texas Title Insurance Basic Manual, Allegiance uses policy forms promulgated by TDI rather than ALTA forms.

 

 

2.     Best Practice: Adopt and maintain appropriate written procedures and controls for Escrow Trust Accounts allowing for electronic verification of reconciliation.

Purpose: Appropriate and effective escrow controls and staff training help title and settlement companies meet client and legal requirements for the safeguarding of client funds. These procedures help ensure accuracy and minimize the exposure to loss of client funds. Settlement companies may engage outside contractors to conduct segregation of trust accounting duties.

Procedures to meet this best practice:

  • Escrow funds and operating accounts are separately maintained.
    • Escrow funds or other funds the Company maintains under a fiduciary duty to another are not commingled with the Company's operating account or an employee or manager's personal account.
  • Escrow Trust Accounts are prepared with Trial Balances.
    • On at least a monthly basis, Escrow Trust Accounts are prepared with Trial Balances ("Three-Way Reconciliation"), listing all open escrow balances.
  • Escrow Trust Accounts are reconciled.
    • On at least a daily basis, reconciliation of the receipts and disbursements of the Escrow Trust Account is performed
    • On at least a monthly basis, a Three-Way Reconciliation is performed reconciling the bank statement, check book and Trial Balances.
    • Segregation of duties is in place to help ensure the reliability of the reconciliation and reconciliations are conducted by someone other than those with signing authority.
    • Results of the reconciliation are reviewed by management and are accessible electronically by the Company's contracted underwriter(s).
  • Escrow Trust Accounts are properly identified.
    • Accounts are identified as "escrow" or "trust" accounts. Appropriate identification appears on all account-related documentation including bank statements, bank agreements, disbursement checks and deposit tickets.
  • Outstanding file balances are documented.
  • Transactions are conducted by authorized employees only.
    • Only those employees whose authority has been defined to authorize bank transactions may do so. Appropriate authorization levels are set by the Company and reviewed for updates annually. Former employees are immediately deleted as listed signatories on all bank accounts.
  • Unless directed by the beneficial owner, Escrow Trust Accounts are maintained in Federally Insured Financial Institutions.
  • Utilize Positive Pay or Reverse Positive Pay, Automated Clearing House blocks and international wire blocks, if available.
    • Background Checks are completed in the hiring process.  At least every three years, obtain Background Checks going back five years for all employees who have access to customer funds.
  • Ongoing training is conducted for employees in management of escrow funds and escrow accounting.

 

Allegiance complies with Best Practice #2.

Allegiance employees are responsible for following the Minimum Escrow Accounting Procedures and Internal Controls ("Minimum Procedures") as found in the most current version of the Texas Title Insurance Basic Manual, which is promulgated by the Texas Department of Insurance. In addition to the Minimum Procedures, Allegiance employees adhere to these procedures:

  1. Three-way reconciliations of escrow trust accounts are performed on a daily basis. If all three parts do not agree, the difference is investigated and corrected.
  2. Results of reconciliations are reviewed by management on a monthly basis.
  3. Results of each reconciliation are provided to the Company's contracted underwriters upon request.
  4. Only those employees whose authority has been defined to authorize bank transactions may do so.  Outgoing wires are initiated and/or approved by the Accounting Department.
  5. Appropriate authorization levels are set by the Company and reviewed for updates at least annually. Former employees are immediately deleted as listed signatories on all bank accounts.
  6. Escrow trust accounts are maintained in federally insured financial institutions.
  7. Positive Pay or Reverse Positive Pay is utilized on all transactions, and Automated Clearing House blocks and international wire blocks are used as available.
  8. Ongoing training is conducted for employees in management of escrow funds and escrow accounting.
  9. Background checks and credit reports are completed for all new employees.  At least every three years, background checks are obtained going back five years for all employees who have access to customer funds.

 

 

3.     Best Practice: Adopt and maintain a written privacy and information security program to protect Non-public Personal Information as required by local, state and federal law.

Purpose: Federal and state laws (including the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act) require title companies to develop a written information security program that describes the procedures they employ to protect Non-public Personal Information. The program must be appropriate to the Company's size and complexity, the nature and scope of the Company's activities, and the sensitivity of the customer information the Company handles. A Company evaluates and adjusts its program in light of relevant circumstances, including changes in the Company's business or operations, or the results of security testing and monitoring.

Procedures to meet this best practice:

  • Physical security of Non-public Personal Information.
    • Restrict access to Non-public Personal Information to authorized employees who have undergone Background Checks at hiring.
    • Prohibit or control the use of removable media.
    • Use only secure delivery methods when transmitting Non-public Personal Information.
  • Network security of Non-public Personal Information.
    • Maintain and secure access to Company information technology.
    • Develop guidelines for the appropriate use of Company information technology.
    • Ensure secure collection and transmission of Non-public Personal Information.
  • Disposal of Non-public Personal Information.
    • Federal law requires companies that possess Non-public Personal Information for a business purpose to dispose of such information properly in a manner that protects against unauthorized access to or use of the information.
  • Establish a disaster management plan.
  • Appropriate management and training of employees to help ensure compliance with Company's information security program.
  • Oversight of service providers to help ensure compliance with a Company's information security program.
    • Companies should take reasonable steps to select and retain service providers that are capable of appropriately safeguarding Non-public Personal Information.
  • Audit and oversight procedures to help ensure compliance with Company's information security program.
    • Companies should review their privacy and information security procedures to detect the potential for improper disclosure of confidential information.
  • Notification of security breaches to customers and law enforcement.
    • Companies should post the privacy and information security program on their websites or provide program information directly to customers in another useable form. When a breach is detected, the Company should have a program to inform customers and law enforcement as required by law.

 

Allegiance complies with Best Practice #3.

Allegiance has adopted several written policies and implemented procedures which incorporate the practices in Best Practice #3 in order to ensure protection of NPI. These policies include: Account Management, Anti-Virus Malware Protection, Application Security, Backup and Media Retention, Clean Desk, Data Retention, Disaster Recovery, IT Security and Computer Usage, Mobile Devices, Non-Public Information Security and Disposal, Password, Privacy and Information Security Audit and Oversight, Remote Access, Security Incident Response, and Security Training and Awareness. Copies of these policies are available upon request.   

Additionally, Allegiance maintains cybersecurity insurance to cover any breach of protected data.

All employees have received and will continue to receive training on these policies through training sessions, memos, and other Allegiance communications, and policies will be reviewed and updated as appropriate to ensure maximum security of consumer NPI.

 

 

4.     Best Practice: Adopt standard real estate settlement procedures and policies that help ensure compliance with Federal and State Consumer Financial Laws as applicable to the Settlement process.

Purpose: Adopting appropriate policies and conducting ongoing employee training helps ensure the Company can meet state, federal, and contractual obligations governing the Settlement.

Procedures to meet this best practice:

  • Recording procedures.
    • Review legal and contractual requirements to determine Company obligations to record documents and incorporate such requirements in its written procedures.
      • Submit or ship documents for recording to the county recorder (or equivalent) or the person or entity responsible for recording within two (2) business days of the later of (i) the date of Settlement, or (ii) receipt by the Company if the Settlement is not performed by the Company.
      • Track shipments of documents for recording.
      • Ensure timely responses to recording rejections.
      • Addressing rejected recordings to prevent unnecessary delay.
      • Verify that recordation actually occurred and maintain a record of the recording information for the document(s).
  • Pricing procedures.
    • Maintain written procedures to help ensure that customers are charged the correct title insurance premium and other rates for services provided by the Company.  These premiums and rates are determined by a mix of legal and contractual obligations.
      • Utilize rate manuals and online calculators, as appropriate, to help ensure correct fees are being charged for title insurance policy premiums, state-specific fees and endorsements.
      • Ensure discounted rates are calculated and charged when appropriate, including refinance or reissue rates.
      • Quality check files after Settlement to help ensure consumers were charged the company's established rates.
      • Provide timely refunds to consumers when an overpayment is detected.


Allegiance complies with Best Practice #4.

Allegiance employees are trained to adhere to the recording and pricing procedures promulgated by the Texas Department of Insurance ("TDI"), as found in the most current version of the Basic Manual, including adherence to the Rate Rules found therein to ensure correct fees are being charged for title insurance policy premiums, state-specific fees and endorsements. TDI's biennial audits of Allegiance include a review for compliance with such rules and regulations.

After Settlement, the Policy Department quality checks all files to verify consumers were charged the appropriate rates.  When an overpayment is detected, Allegiance provides timely refunds to consumers.

Allegiance ensures that documents are submitted for recording within 2 business days of Settlement, using electronic recording and shipment tracking when available. An Escrow Production Assistant in the Allegiance Production Center is tasked with managing recordings for all Allegiance branches, including verification that recordation actually occurred and maintenance of records of the recording information. The Escrow Production Assistant ensures timely responses to recording rejections and addresses rejected recordings to prevent unnecessary delay.

 


5.     Best Practice: Adopt and maintain written procedures related to title policy production, delivery, reporting and premium remittance.

Purpose: Adopting appropriate procedures for the production, delivery, and remittance of title insurance policies helps ensure title companies can meet their legal and contractual obligations.

Procedures to meet this best practice:

  • Title policy production and delivery.
    • Title insurance policies are issued and delivered to customers in a timely manner to meet statutory, regulatory or contractual obligations.
      • Issue and deliver policies within thirty days of the later of (i) the date of Settlement, or (ii) the date that the terms and conditions of title insurance commitment are satisfied.
  • Premium reporting and remittance.
    • Title insurance policies are reported and premiums are remitted to the underwriter in a timely manner to meet statutory, regulatory or contractual obligations.
      • Report policies (including a copy of the policy) to underwriter by the last day of the month following the month in which the insured transaction was settled.
      • Remit premiums to underwriter by the last day of the month following the month in which the insured transaction was settled.

 

Allegiance complies with Best Practice #5.

Allegiance ensures compliance with its statutory, regulatory, and contractual obligations, including those promulgated in the Basic Manual and for which Allegiance is audited by the Texas Department of Insurance, regarding title policy production and delivery and premium reporting and remittance.

Title insurance policies are delivered within 30 days of the end of the month in which settlement occurred if terms and conditions of the title insurance commitment have been satisfied. Additionally, title insurance policies are reported and premiums remitted in a timely manner to meet statutory, regulatory, or contractual obligations, and in no event later than the last day of the month following the month in which the insured transaction was settled.

 


6.     Best Practice: Maintain appropriate professional liability insurance and fidelity coverage.

Purpose: Appropriate levels of professional liability insurance or errors and omissions insurance help ensure title agencies and settlement companies maintain the financial capacity to stand behind their professional services. In addition, state law and title insurance underwriting agreements may require a company to maintain professional liability insurance or errors and omissions insurance, fidelity coverage or surety bonds.

Procedures to meet this best practice:

  • The Company maintains professional liability insurance or errors and omissions insurance.
  • The Company complies with requirements for professional liability insurance, errors and omissions insurance, fidelity coverage or surety bonds, as provided by state law or title insurance underwriting agreements.

 

Allegiance complies with Best Practice #6.

Allegiance maintains an amount of professional liability insurance from a carrier that is acceptable to the underwriter and in an amount not less than agreed to by the company's underwriting agreements.

In accordance with state law or contractual obligations, Allegiance maintains the required amount of fidelity bond coverage and/or surety bond coverage from a carrier that is acceptable to the underwriter in an amount not less than the amount required by state law or agreed to in the company's underwriting agreements.

Allegiance Title Company issues closing protection letters, also known as insured closing letters, through its title insurance underwriters when requested and in accordance with state regulation.

7.     Best Practice: Adopt and maintain written procedures for resolving consumer complaints.

Purpose: A process for receiving and addressing consumer complaints helps ensure reported instances of poor service or non-compliance do not go undiscovered.

Procedures to meet this best practice:

  • Consumer complaint intake, documentation and tracking.
    • Standard procedures for logging and resolving consumer complaints helps ensure consumers provide the company with sufficient information to understand the nature and scope of the complaint.
      • Develop a standard consumer complaint form that identifies information that connects the complaint to a specific transaction.
      • Set a single point of contact for consumer complaints.
      • Establish procedures for forwarding complaints to appropriate personnel.
      • Maintain a log of consumer complaints that includes whether and how the complaint was resolved.

 

Allegiance complies with Best Practice #7.

All Allegiance employees are responsible for promptly and seriously addressing any complaint made by a customer against Allegiance or its employees. Employees receiving a communication from a customer with a complaint are required to refer it immediately to the appropriate person for resolution. If the complaint cannot be courteously and effectively addressed at the branch office level, then the branch manager refers the complaint to executive management. Executive management contacts the complainant within a reasonable period of time, and the Compliance Officer documents information pertinent to the complaint in writing. All formal complaints against Allegiance Title Company or its employees are documented using the Allegiance Title Company Customer Complaint Form, and a record of these complaints is kept at the corporate office.

Allegiance has additionally incorporated an Online Customer Complaint Form onto the website, and the Compliance Officer monitors the inbox for submissions received via that platform. The above procedures for handling complaints apply to all complaints, regardless of the method by which the complaint was received (in-person, phone, fax, email, website, etc.).

When answering a complaint, Allegiance employees are instructed not to confirm, discuss, or reveal the consumer's specific information without confirmation of the caller's identity as the consumer in question, representative on file, or someone otherwise authorized by a court of competent jurisdiction or the consumer in writing.

 

 

For more information and details about Allegiance's specific policies and procedures, including copies of the NPI policies mentioned under Best Practice #3, please contact Blair McCartney at bmccartney@allegiancetitle.com